News: Grow Eastern Bay


10/12/2012

Ganesh Nana chief economist from Business and Economic Research Limited (BERL) was an inspiring guest speaker.   His speech focussed on how the world had changed during the global financial crisis and how it’s likely to take another 10 years to climb out of it.  New Zealand has a non-government debt problem and an imbalance of credit available to asset-backed investment (surplus) and business (deficit), which aggravates the problem. He advised that New Zealand needed to focus on developing long-term relationships in Asian markets to grow our income from exports, to “think different” and to add value to primary products.

The Grow Eastern Bay Business and Economic Development Forum took place on December 3rd at the Awakeri Events Centre.  Approximately 100 business and community representatives attended the event from a range of sectors including; industry, horticulture, agriculture, Iwi, tourism, retail and property development.   The aim of the forum was to gather information and ideas from sector representatives to input into the Eastern Bay Business and Economic Development Strategy. 

The Forum was also preceded by a hui of local iwi representatives, as part of the development of the Bay of Connections Maori Economic Development Strategy.

Ganesh Nana chief economist from Business and Economic Research Limited (BERL) was an inspiring guest speaker.   His speech focussed on how the world had changed during the global financial crisis and how it’s likely to take another 10 years to climb out of it.  New Zealand has a non-government debt problem and an imbalance of credit available to asset-backed investment (surplus) and business (deficit), which aggravates the problem. He advised that New Zealand needed to focus on developing long-term relationships in Asian markets to grow our income from exports, to “think different” and to add value to primary products.
Attendees then split into sector groups to discuss the regional issues, barriers, opportunities and actions to contribute to the Eastern Bay strategy.  The groups highlighted their key actions and opportunities, which included a number of suggestions on: maintaining a strategic and long term approach to the region’s development, improved trades education, building on the iconic White Island brand, developing land and infrastructure, and investing in off-shore market relationships.

Participants were also challenged to stay involved in sector and interest clusters.

A full report will be developed with the assistance of Sarah Beaman of Strategic Reality and distributed to attendees and key stakeholders in January.